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20121001
20121031
STATION
LINKTV 13
LANGUAGE
English 13
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
LINKTV
Oct 29, 2012 7:30pm PDT
," and it was my first mural in the city of los angeles in the hall and beck band show. and it's a work about my grandmother, with arms open to the children from the afuereÑos niÑos, who could dance in her arms. in terms of farmworking images, there are very few that exist that are from the position of farmworkers -- their experiences and their life. the guadalupe mural project represents a yearlong residency in the city of guadalupe, which is a farmworking town in central california. another very early work is a piece called the "uprising of the mujeres." that figure of the indigenous woman who's rising up out of the fields has become something of a synonymous image with my work. in public spaces in los angeles, the spaces are controlled by young people. if i was to paint on one of these walls... i was going to have to have their permission. and so i began to organize gangs. people were really amazed that there were gang members painting, and the los angeles times carried the first article ever wri en about my work. it said, "gang members put down knives for brushes." and i spent seven years
LINKTV
Oct 26, 2012 3:00pm PDT
's first cities in places like sumer in ancient mesopotamia. but how did farming begin in the new world ? when scotty macneish first came to the tehuacan valley in 1962, he was seeking the answer to one simple question -- did agriculture evolve here or was it introduced from the old world ? then we'll measure out from the corners. keach: in a stratum of the purron cave that had been laid down thousands of years later than those in which he found the hunters and gatherers, macneish made a discovery that exceeded all expectations. macneish: this is a corn cob, and it's a real little one. keach: it may have looked insignificant, but the shriveled ear dated to about 5000 b.c. it was the earliest evidence of farming ever discovered in the new world. since corn is a staple crop, it would have allowed a nomadic hunting/gathering way of life to evolve into a settled agricultural one. corn slowly evolved in the new world from tiny ears, like the one macneish discovered, to the size we know today. like staple crops of the old world, such as wheat and barley, corn has a wonderful property. corn ca
LINKTV
Oct 18, 2012 11:30am PDT
the change in air quality that you experience nowadays when you travel to delhi. when you land in the city, the first thing that you are aware of as you exit your airplane is the thickness of the air that surrounds you. it almost has a physical presence in terms of its quality because there's so much dust and particulate matter-- fumes from cars, industrial emissions and manufacturing emissions-- that the quality of the air is... is and feels very dangerous. it's not uncommon to go for a walk in delhi for half an hour and to come back with black coating around the outside of your nostrils or on your clothes. and it's really been assessed by the world health organization as one of the ten most polluted cities-- in terms of its air quality-- in the world, and that is a very recent phenomenon. i would say in the last 15 years air quality has become devastating in terms of what it's doing to people's health. man: ...delhi and the delhi metropolitan area are down... narrator: the national capital region plan board is attempting to solve some of these problems. it has formulated a comprehensive
LINKTV
Oct 25, 2012 11:00am PDT
the western half of jerusalem. they made their first capital in tel aviv. jerusalem became a divided city. the boundary drawn between west and east jerusalem was called the "green line," and that's what highway number one is still called today. east jerusalem was then part of jordan, and it contained the jews' holiest sites, including their ancient temple, destroyed by the romans. once the temple was destroyed, all that remained was the western wall. this place is important for the jewish people worldwide. ross: this is what people prayed to ever since the second temple was destroyed, ever since the jewish people were dispersed. narrator: but because they were in jordanian east jerusalem, the site was off limits to jews until 1967. that year, israel defeated threatening arab armies in the six-day war and gained control over more territory. from syria they took the golan heights. from egypt they captured the sinai peninsula and the gaza strip. from jordan they occupied the west bank of the jordan river, including the rest of jerusalem. ross: after the six-day war, after the victory in '67,
LINKTV
Oct 19, 2012 3:00pm PDT
that archaeologists call the first cradle of civilization. today the ruins of these once grand cities crumble in the dry desert earth. but how could civilization have emerged in such an arid environment in the first place ? and what might have caused its destruction ? data from mashkan shapir provide clues. stone: we found a very large palace structure, which was decorated with baked clay pieces, showing the city's own god -- nergal, the god of death. zimansky: there was a large temple area, in which we found pieces of sculpture -- lifesize and somewhat smaller -- of animals, human beings, all of which were probably part of the temple furniture. keach: they also found fish hooks, weights to hold down nets and fish spears -- all evidence there was once water here. written tablets like these describe mashkan shapir as a major port. but the city was 20 miles from the tigris river and 30 miles from the euphrates. how could a major inland port or any city, for that matter, survive in the desert so far from water ? stone begins a search for the source of water. for a perspective not possible from t
LINKTV
Oct 31, 2012 9:00am PDT
and civilization. many of the world's great cities were first established as riverside settlements, and throughout their history these cities have depended on the river for food, a water supply, and an avenue of transport and trade. but like all natural systems, rivers undergo relatively rare but extreme events. river flooding is a threat to nearly every nation on earth. in the united states, floods exact the greatest toll of any geologic hazard, causing billions of dollars in property damage and killing about 100 people every year. and this loss is modest when compared to the destruction in countries with primitive flood control systems, or the devastation in preindustrial societies which were visited by floods without warning. like most natural systems, rivers change and evolve through time in response to a variety of geologic factors that are themselves changing. factors such as regional climate, hill slope, tectonic activity, vegetation, and the bedrock composition of the earth's crust. so the behavior of rivers is controlled by physical laws and geologic processes that can be observed and und
LINKTV
Oct 9, 2012 11:30am PDT
had helped capture jerusalem in the first crusade. henri's branch of the family came from the red-brick city of albi in the south of france. henri grew up in a world of chateaus and privilege in a family living on the fruits of its noble past. but a france governed by the middle class was losing its taste for nobility. like many aristocrats, his father alphonse retreated into rural pastimes-- riding and hunting. an eccentric, he looked wistfully back to the family's glorious past. alphonse had married his first cousin adele, a common practice in a class anxious to preserve the purity of its bloodlines. but the results of inbreeding for henri were uncommonly cruel. his legs were short and weak. he broke each of them in early adolescence and stopped growing when he was 14. he was just under five feet tall. his head, hands and torso continued to develop. but his stunted legs made walking painful for the rest of his life. denied the aristocratic pleasures of riding and hunting, henri turned to sketching and painting rural scenes. he had a flair for it and in 1882, at the age of 18, he
LINKTV
Oct 11, 2012 11:00am PDT
minh city is the ce industry's center as well. rice from the provinces arrives at places like the bi tay mill. in 199became the first mill in vietnam to supply rice to the united states, where this shipment is headed. other shipments goe to the middle eastates, and elsewhere in asia. daniere: it's a wonderfully located city in terms of export potential. it's ideally located to ship things in and out. narrator: vietnam has successfully transformed its rice industry by establishing clear rights of control over land, by making effective use of irrigation and by ensuring ready access to world markets. anperhaps stmportantly, it's due tthe rts of farming families like le van than's they are changing a long history of rice farming in the mekong delta. now they are not only feeding vietnam, but helping build a major sustainable export industry. vietnam has been one of the most rapidly growing countries of the last decade. we see this in t boomi urban centerf ho chi minh city. one key to this development has been vietnam's physical geography, along with a shift from collective to commercial
LINKTV
Oct 2, 2012 11:00am PDT
as the pharaoh's last resting-place. they were the first stop on a long night's journey to everlasting life. by 1550 bc, power had shifted to a n kingdom 500 miles south in the ancient city of thebes, now called luxor. to the west, in the hills beyond the nile's west bank, the royal tombs of the valley of the kings were cut into limestone cliffs. their interiors are richly decorated with hieroglyphs and paintings-- signs and symbols that detail the necessary steps to attain immortality. egypt's power and the grandeur that came with it were well-established by 2500 bc when the great pyramids at giza were built. the sphinx was a philosophy of government set in stone. it depicted the king as fearless, cunning and brave as the lion. and as crucial to egypt as the nile itself. the king was not just a political leader but a religious leader too. in the minds of the ancient egyptians, the pharaoh's power and authority as a king stretched far beyond the boundaries of his country-- and into the cosmos itself. after death, he would escape the earthly bounds of his tomb, board a solar boat and sail in
LINKTV
Oct 11, 2012 8:00am PDT
. the thieves have their rights, man, you know?" and other thing is we get so used to it, so used to it. first, the bar on this one as ain't before, you know, the whole city is a barricade, you know? something that happens slowly, slowly, slowly, you get used to and you accept. it's like the nuclear missiles, right? first a few, right? then a few more, then a few more gradually they-- living in a whole world ready to blow up and well, you kinda get used to it. [laughter] small enough doses. something happens in san francisco at fisherman's wharf all the time that kinda bothers me. it's like auschwitz there. auschwitz. you get down there you wanna get your crabs, you wanna get your lobsters or you go to fisherman's wharf and you wanna order a nice lobster dinner. now how do you-- what do you think that-- with that lobster you're eating, what do you suppose-- the fate of that lobster is before you eat it? they come out and say, "hey, do you want this one here?" and this old charlie go like this, you know, "hey, hey, not me, not me." [laughter] and take you on your charlie's. what do they do to t
LINKTV
Oct 5, 2012 3:00pm PDT
, from the very first ancestor, from the founder of the copan dynasty. keach: archaeologists now believe that each city across the maya realm was ruled by its own king. this was not a single empire like the aztecs created, but hundreds of independent kingdoms existing side by side. but what power did these kings have, and how did they use it ? the royal precinct of copan is a kind of manmade acropolis, supporting enormous pyramids and temples. in its day, each building and plaza would have been coated with white plaster and painted in bright colors. maya kings had the ability to organize and manage the construction of great buildings. these projects consumed much of the kingdom's available resources and served to express the control the king had over his subjects. archaeologist robert sharer. obviously, these buildings were not built by the kings or even the members of the elite, although we can expect that there were architects and craftsmen who were members of the elite class who planned these and may have done some of the detailed work to decorate these. but the basic labor, the movin
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)